EU Regulators Leave FM200/227 Alone

The European Commission issued the attached report that reviews of the application, effects and adequacy of the F-Gas Regulation.  The report draws from the results of an analytical study.

The report concludes that the EU should take further action to reduce emissions of F-gases beyond the existing regulation and presents the following options:

  • gradually declining limits on the quantity of F-gases placed on the EU market
  • use and marketing prohibitions for new equipment and products (bans)
  • voluntary environmental agreements

The report does not present specific options for the fire protection sector.  As previously reported, the analytical study proposes a voluntary agreement leading to a ban on the use of HFC-23 in fire protection.

The report includes the following information related to fire protection:

  • The labeling provisions of the F-gas regulation apply to approximately “100 suppliers of gas containers including for fire protection systems.”
  • More than 50% of personnel and 90% of companies in the fire protection sector are not yet certified.  Eight Member States have not yet notified the Commission on their training and certification systems.
  • Compliance with containment measures has been applied to a higher extent in the fire protection sector due to existing voluntary technical standards.
  • Recovery in the fire protection sector is currently a commonly applied practice during servicing and maintenance.  The potential for recovery from systems containing F-gases will grow in the coming years, as such systems will be reaching their end of life.
  • Available low-GWP fluids could enable a gradual cost-effective substitution of F-gases in applications including fire protection.

On the basis of this report, the Commission has launched a consultation that invites stakeholders to comment on possible options for strengthening EU measures to reduce emissions of fluorinated gases.

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